TWDB's Water Data for Texas website now includes groundwater data

For immediate release.  Contact: Kimberly Leggett at 512-463-5129

AUSTIN - (March 18, 2014) - Today Texans are more aware than ever of the importance of groundwater.  As part of ongoing efforts to synthesize and communicate water-related data to scientists, policy makers and the public, the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) today announced its Water Data for Texas website now includes groundwater data.  The website has been a source of information on reservoirs and drought since November 2012.

TWDB's Recorder Well Program has more than doubled in the past 15 years, partially because more groundwater conservation districts are participating in the program. TWDB currently maintains 184 recorders in 79 counties.  In addition to the TWDB network, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Edwards Aquifer Authority also maintain their own networks of recorder wells in the state.  All of these data, including the U.S. Geological Survey and Edwards Aquifer Authority networks, are now available at waterdatafortexas.org.

Although the equipment and technology have changed over the years, continuous, automated groundwater-level measurements have been collected for over 80 years in Texas.  Recorders are on the front lines of data collection, allowing analysis of short- and long-term groundwater level trends, and providing groundwater conservation districts, water supply companies, and municipalities with daily information for drought management.

The passage of Senate Bill 1 in 1997 initially funded TWDB's efforts to launch a near real-time recorder program and publish water-levels online.

For questions or comments, please contact TWDB staff.

The TWDB is the state agency charged with collecting and disseminating water-related data, assisting with regional planning and preparing the state water plan for the development of the state’s water resources. The TWDB administers cost-effective financial assistance programs for the construction of water supply, wastewater treatment, flood control, and agricultural water conservation projects.

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