Industrial, Commercial & Institutional (ICI)

ICI Resources | FAQs

The Industrial, Commercial, Institutional (ICI) program was developed to help industries, businesses, and institutions improve water efficiency.  On request TWDB provides informational brochures, technical assistance, and workshops to entities across the state.

Industrial

Water consumption by industries, whether supplied by others or self-supplied from surface or groundwater sources, can be varied in amount of use, rate of use, and opportunities for efficiency.  The wide variety in the types of water uses, the size of facilities, and the types of activities at different industrial facilities makes it difficult to compare one water user to another.

Each industrial water user should evaluate water use and efficiency potential at its own facility(s).  As a result, the initial recommended Best Management Practice (BMP) for all industrial water users is the Industrial Water Audit BMP where the user identifies the relationships between all water coming into the facility and the various uses of water within.

Additional Industrial BMPs focus on the most economical changes to improve efficiency, water use monitoring, and reducing water used in cooling.  For a detailed description of these BMPs refer to the Industrial BMPs in the Water Conservation Best Management Practices.

For additional resources on loan programs and tax incentives, visit the ICI Resources page.

Commercial and Institutional

Water consumption by commercial and institutional facilities is varied in the amount of use, rate of use, and opportunities for efficiency.  However, commercial and institutional facilities typically use water in the six following areas, as applicable: restrooms, laundries, cooling and heating, landscapes, recreation, and kitchens.

In order to conserve water efficiently, commercial and institutional facilities should develop a water management plan that includes Water Conservation Best Management Practices.

A water management plan examines how changes in water use will impact areas of operation and examines how much water is being used and who is using it.  A water management plan must take into consideration the true cost of water, which includes not only the price of water but the cost to heat, cool, treat, pump, and discharge that water.  To quantify the effectiveness of water conservation techniques refer to TWDB's document Quantifying the Effectiveness of Various Water Conservation Techniques in Texas.

For additional resources on loan programs and tax incentives, visit the ICI Resources page.

Beginning September 2011, all new construction of state buildings and institutions of higher education facilities will be required to abide by the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) water efficiency standards as directed by the 77th Texas Legislative session.  To view these standards refer to the Water Efficiency Standards for State Buildings and Institutions of Higher Education Facilities published by SECO.

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