The City of Wichita Falls (Wichita County) receives the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s PISCES award for excellence and innovation for an indirect potable reuse system

For immediate release.  Contact: Kimberly Leggett at 512-463-5129

AUSTIN – (November 9, 2018) – The City of Wichita Falls (Wichita County) was named a recipient of the Clean Water State Revolving Fund’s Performance and Innovation in the SRF Creating Environmental Success (PISCES) award administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for an indirect potable reuse project. The project was nominated and funded by the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB).

In 2014, the TWDB approved $33,797,597 in financial assistance, consisting of a $33,545,000 loan and $252,597 in loan forgiveness, from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) for the project.

The City is using the assistance to finance the planning, design, and construction costs associated with developing a permanent indirect potable reuse system that will extend the City’s current supplies by treating effluent and blending it with water in Lake Arrowhead.

The City was in a long-term drought that required it to impose significant water restrictions on residential and commercial customers. As a result, City leaders moved forward with the reuse project, which will provide a long-term sustainable water source.

The EPA’s PISCES program provides national recognition for CWSRF-funded projects that demonstrate exceptional accomplishments in promoting human health and improving water quality. CWSRF programs have provided more than $125 billion in financing for water quality infrastructure since 1987. To learn more about the PISCES program, visit the EPA’s website.

The TWDB is the state agency charged with collecting and disseminating water-related data, assisting with regional planning, and preparing the state water plan for the development of the state’s water resources. The TWDB administers cost-effective financial assistance programs for the construction of water supply, wastewater treatment, flood control, and agricultural water conservation projects.

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